HORTENSE de BEAUHARNAIS

DAUGHTER OF AN EMPRESS
QUEEN OF HOLLAND
MOTHER OF AN EMPEROR

vrijdag 21 januari 2011

Bed, boudoir, bath

The bathroom of Emperor Napoleon I Bonaparte in Versailles.


The breakfast room of Emperor Napoleon I Bonaparte and Empress Marie-Louise in the Trianon in Versailles. The table is laid with the Empire style Tea-set "Vieux-Paris", property of the Emperor. One of his hats on the couch in the background.

Bedroom of Marie-Louise, seond wife of Napoleon I. Furniture by Jacob Desmalter; 1809

Bedroom of Queen Hortense, daughter of Josephine Beauharnais. Hortense married Louis, King of Holland, Napoleon's brother. She is the mother of Emperor Napoleon III. Furniture (1805/06) by the brothers Jacob.


Boudoir of Empress Marie-Louise, second wife of Napoleon I Bonaparte (1808)

Bedroom Malmaison


 
A tent-like theme is Josephine's round bedroom. A circle of painted sky is revealed at the top of the faux tent. Gilt-wood poles hold up the lushly draped red silk "tent". The poles lead the eye up to a frieze with gold motifs in abstract loops, spirals, and circles on a red ground. The carpet is cream with red, gold, and royal blue decorations. The amazing bed has a canopy topped with a great golden eagle and bordered in red and gold. The bed curtains are cream with gold border embroidery on the outside and lined with a curtain of cream with gold flowers. The golden bed, designed by Jacob Desmalter, is flanked at the head with swans and at the foot by brimming cornucopias. A portable writing desk which adds to the illusion that the room is part of a military camp. Draperies are pulled back to reveal the white marble fireplace and the over mirror. The room is warm and rich in appearance.

zondag 9 januari 2011

Jewelry, shoes and dress of Josephine de Beauharnais.


Josephine's Sapphire and Diamond Diadem


Jewelry of Josephine


Dresses of Josephine


Shoes of Josephine

zaterdag 8 januari 2011

Trees in Paris

Within France between 1804 and 1813 Napoleon spent 277 million on roads, and to ensure that they were protected from the sun, in 1811 he initiated a law declaring that all roads "not planted with trees and capable of being, shall be palnted." More than any other royal decree or royal palace this simple law was to change the look of France. - Vincent Cronin

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